Author Bio

Andrea Ortega

Andrea ha desarrollado estrategias de comunicación interna y externa para diferentes equipos del Grupo BID, además de haber sido editora del blog Negocios Sostenibles y del Informe Anual de BID Invest. Fue coordinadora nacional de prensa del Servicio Agrícola y Ganadero del Ministerio de Agricultura en Chile, y periodista del periódico chileno El Mercurio, donde se especializó en economía y agronegocios. En 2012, recibió el Premio a la Innovación y Calidad en Periodismo Capa/Alltech. Andrea es máster en relaciones públicas y comunicación corporativa por Georgetown University y autora del libro "Multitiendas: El Negocio del Siglo XXI".

Post in Andrea Ortega

Three keys for supporting Caribbean tourism after natural disasters
Three keys for supporting Caribbean tourism after natural disasters

For the tourism sector, the second most important source of employment in the region, there will be a period of inactivity estimated to last between three to four months. This could reduce the sector’s revenue by as much as 50%, according to the World Travel and Tourism Council.

Three ways banks can attract millennials
Three ways banks can attract millennials

71% of the millennials in the United States would rather go to the dentist than listen to what banks are saying, according to the Millennial Disruption Index, while 35% of the banks in Latin America feel they are not meeting the needs of this generation, and 71% admit they are unable to rapidly adapt to technological advances, according to a study done by the GMix program of Stanford University and Technisys. However, in upcoming years this age group will be the main source of consumers and labor. Millennials represent close to 30% of the population in Latin America and the Caribbean. For more than half of them, only innovative companies will be successful. In effect, four out of every ten believe that the private sector is the true driver of innovation, according to a survey conducted by Deloitte. For this reason, banks in the region are looking for new formulas to attract them: 1.     Chile: Collaborative spaces The millennials are the “BRICs” of the age groups: due to their size, they can disrupt the economy, particularly the banking industry, according to Scratch. In Chile, banks are betting on collaborative spaces to approach this generation. Thus, was born Work/Café, a space open to the general public for working, holding meetings, and using free Wi-Fi and that already has six locations in the country. The Santander Group’s wager includes a cafeteria with discounts for clients, executives specializing in financial advice, and ATMs for cashing checks, making deposits, and transferring funds. Another characteristic sought by millennials is flexibility. Thus, these branches add four hours to traditional banking hours in Chile, remaining open for 18 hours, Monday through Thursday. Work/Café also gives talks in order to keep capturing clients constantly. [clickToTweet tweet="35% of the banks in #Latam feel they are not meeting the needs of the millennials" quote="35% of the banks in Latin America feel they are not meeting the needs of the millennials" theme="style1"] 2.     Brazil: 100% virtual In Latin America and the Caribbean, 55% of the population buys products via the Internet and 90% of millennials are digital banking clients. For this reason, a Brazilian bank made the decision to be the first 100% digital bank. Banco Original developed a website, applications for mobile telephones, tablets, and even Smart TVs to reach its public on line and close its branches. To avoid in-person visits, this Brazilian bank developed a site with services for personal, commercial, and agribusiness banking. In addition, it developed Bot Original, a service enabling interactions via Messenger and even on Facebook, with a robotic system of instantaneous responses for clients. 3.     Mexico: On-line support for SMEs One of the region’s largest financing gaps is experienced by small and medium enterprises (SMEs); this gap is estimated at between $210 billion and $250 billion. However, for more than half of the region’s millennials, a venture is one of the most important achievements. Thus, the banking system is seeking ways to facilitate access to financing for SMEs given that applications for financing for companies of this type still require in-person visits in many countries. Bankaool, Mexico’s first 100% on-line bank, developed financing tools for SMEs. Clients can apply for and receive financing for their businesses in a more streamlined and expeditious way. This has also allowed the bank to carve out a niche within the financial industry based on its work generating inclusive businesses. Innovative wagers continue to flourish in the region and in the rest of the world, from applications for different financial operations and the use of biometric profiles, to the development of products for women’s banking. They all seek a positive effect on returns, efficiency, and the consumer’s experience. It is thus essential to continue looking for strategies that make attracting millennials possible since, as John D. Wright once said, “Business is like riding a bicycle. Either you keep moving or you fall down.” Now we need to see what the banking sector’s next move will be in the region. Subscribe to receive more content like this! [mc4wp_form]

Six key steps to become an energy efficiency expert
Six key steps to become an energy efficiency expert

Energy efficiency is a key part of cutting costs at any business or in any household. That said, do you know how to perform an energy audit or where you can learn how to do so?

The issues that marked the private sector in 2017
The issues that marked the private sector in 2017

For the private sector, 2017 was a year marked by major changes and a call to prepare for the future. From the damages done by natural phenomena to the adoption of new technologies, several factors made this the year of adaptation, for both businesses and people. In this context, many Latin American and Caribbean countries began to explore new ways to grow, invest and even generate energy. Here we share the most discussed issues in 2017: 1.     Solar energy took off In 2017, the constant increase in oil prices and the reduced cost of photovoltaic panels helped to spur notable growth in solar power, both in the developed markets and in Latin America and the Caribbean. The growth of this industry has gone hand in hand with the public and private sectors in the region, which have worked on procurement policies and programs to incentivize the use of clean energies, to transform the energy matrix and stimulate private investment. Review once again which countries are leading in solar energy in the region. 2.     Natural disasters demand sustainable buildings Hurricanes and floods produced millions in losses, in Latin America and the Caribbean and the rest of the world during 2017. Hurricane Irma devastated the Caribbean, while other phenomena also left their mark in various countries of the region. For all of them, the lesson was clear: sustainable buildings are required. In all sectors, climate change is expected to continue causing havoc, and for this reason infrastructure must be increasingly more resilient. After the storm, many have already made the decision to adapt. We leave you with the case of Peru and its model of Reconstruction with Changes following the floods that swept through the north of the country. 3.     Bitcoin whets investors’ appetite Bitcoin was another main issue in 2017. The cryptocurrency achieved fame when it entered the market, with prices above US$17,000, awakening crowds’ appetite. Although there are still many experts who warn about the risks of investing in digital currency, the imminent bubble it can cause in the markets, and the lack of regulation, it quickly became widespread. For many, investing in Bitcoin is a new way to diversify funds and even offset inflation in their countries. Also for this reason, every day there are more who seek to dabble in digital mining. Here we share the opportunities and dangers of Bitcoin mining in our region. 2017 was a year for adapting to new forms of construction, new ways to generate energy and even new ways to save and invest. For companies in Latin America and the Caribbean, this capacity will be key to continuing to have an impact on development and growing sustainably. As Peter Druker says: “the entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it and exploits it as an opportunity.” What changes do you think will occur in 2018? Discover the rest of most searched terms during the year in Google Year in Search 2017.

Why do some SMEs suffer from Peter Pan syndrome?
Why do some SMEs suffer from Peter Pan syndrome?

In 1983, Dan Kiley revolutionized psychology with his book The Peter Pan Syndrome, a condition characterized by a fear of growing up and assuming responsibilities. But today, individuals aren't the only ones who suffer from this syndrome: businesses do as well.

Three reasons why sustainability supports SME growth
Three reasons why sustainability supports SME growth

Doing business these days is about more than just profitability. It’s also about sustainability, even for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Despite this, lots of SMEs are standing on the sidelines, hesitant to make investments in sustainability that don't guarantee an immediate return. So let's look at these three reasons to invest in SME sustainability initiatives: